First Cross-Cultural Orientation in Haiti

With 21 participants and a leadership team from three different countries, a Cross-Cultural Orientation (CCO) was held in Montrouis, Haiti from December 7 to 9, 2017.

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During each activity and workshop, there was an atmosphere of expectation; those who attended were eager to learn more about missions. Our Haitian brothers and sisters were enthusiastic to learn more about missionary service and how they, too, can be part of what God is doing through the Church of the Nazarene around the world.IMG_2920.JPG

Although this is the first CCO that has been held in this country, it will assuredly not be the last. It is undoubtedly exciting to see that God is calling people from everywhere to everywhere!

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Marc Versil, Global Mission Coordinator of the Haiti Field, said: “Thank you all for your prayers.  The CCO in Haiti was a very interesting and productive event, and we give all glory to God!”

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One participant shared: “The CCO made me know how I can be an effective missionary, and how to help people to know Christ and to be his disciples.”

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Finally, Scott Armstrong, Global Mission Regional Coordinator, said: “This was a historic event.  For the first-time ever the CCO was able to be held in Haiti, a country that has for many decades received missionaries.  It was encouraging to see, however, that God is calling missionaries from Haiti and they are responding!  It will be exciting to see how this country rises up as a sending and sustaining missionary force in the years ahead.”

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CCO – Nicaragua, 2017

From November 24-26, 2017 the Nicaragua North District held a Cross Cultural Orientation, with 48 participants from 4 countries in Central America: Costa Rica, Nicaragua, El Salvador and Guatemala. In addition, 12 volunteer missionaries were serving in the CCO. During this time, the youth were able to listen to testimonies of what God is doing in other nations, and also what He is doing in the lives of the missionaries who have decided to be obedient to God’s voice. Many of the participants confirmed their calling and others found out how to keep serving in missions.

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Participants’ testimonies:

Kevin.jpg“Thank you, Global Mission for such an amazing job. This past weekend was exceptional and, without a doubt, God spoke to me and made my heart uncomfortable to leave my comfort zone. Learning about the missionary work that we do as a church trilled me, but knowing about all the need that is still taking place in our world touched my heart. The fact of knowing that there is still so much to do challenges me to be involved in different ways: giving, going, praying and fasting. I want to be Jesus’ hands and feet here on earth, I want to have a missional heart as He does, in which He gave everything through love to those most in need. This CCO helped me to change my perspective of missions, it inspired me to be a part of them and to have a willing heart to be able to serve and without fear say: Here I am, send me.”

– Kevin Rodríguez. El Salvador.

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COM nicaragua 8.jpg“The CCO is a space where the youth can discover and understand God’s calling to their lives concerning missions. It’s a huge blessing to begin to prepare yourself, to have a prelude of how all of our missionary brothers and sisters live, and to listen to their experiences, to be able to see how God is glorified in their lives, and also to learn how to do missions from our own home. I thank God for the opportunity of being able to participate in the CCO and confirm my calling to missions. The more a missionary is willing to let the Holy Spirit to guide him, the more He will bless his work.”

– Edgar Revelo. El Salvador.

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“I’ve been serving as a pastor for the Church of the Nazarene, and I have never understood missions until the day I attended the CCO. Before this I used to give only 10 cordobas for missions, now I’m going to give as much as I can.”

– Pastor Modesto Leal. Nicaragua.

Fily.jpg“It was an intense experience. The trainers had the necessary experience to communicate the message to the youth of our region who have the enthusiasm to serve our God. I’m thankful for the opportunity that the youth have to be involved in the churches. The CCO opens your eyes and heart to understand the calling that we receive from our Heavenly Father, in many ways. One of the sermons impacted me greatly. It was shared by Luz Jimenez. It made me reconsider, react and take up again the calling to missions with greater spiritual and physical strength. The CCO makes unique connections between the youth of our beloved Church of the Nazarene, and also brings us together as brothers and sisters. The CCO makes us share the tools that we are using to fulfill Jesus’ commandment for His Church. The CCO leaves a print in the heart that it will never be forgotten.”

– Filiberto Yat. Guatemala.

 

 

Global Mission Mesoamerica – 2017

From October 19 to 24, 2017, the Mesoamerica Global Mission regional coordinators, Scott and Emily Armstrong, gathered together with the field coordinators of this ministry: Maria Eugenia Rodriguez (Mexico), Marc Versil (Haiti), Luz Jimenez (Northcentral), Dario Richards (Caribbean), Freya Galindo (Central); and the NYI regional coordinator, Milton Gay, to have meetings and attend the “Movement Day” conference in New York City, USA. Claudia Cruz (Mexico), participated in some meetings through videoconference, from Oaxaca.

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During these meetings, there was a great focus on how to continue discovering, developing and deploying more missionaries in the Mesoamerica region, emphasizing the Genesis initiative and urban mission.  Also, during the Movement Day sessions, they engaged in various presentations and discussions about leadership, urban issues and their connection with the power of the Gospel in the city.

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The challenges to keep mobilizing missionaries are great, but our God is greater. On the final day, the team went up to the roof of the New York School of Urban Ministry, where they were gathered, and they prayed for the cities. It was a powerful moment for each coordinator, and Marc Versil expressed this desire to change the world well: “As God invested His heart in me, I want to invest my heart in others.”

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This report was written by Freya Galindo.

Luther and Nazarenes

Today (October 13, 2017) we celebrate the 109th Anniversary of the founding of the Church of the Nazarene.  Happy Birthday, Nazarenes!

Throughout this month we are also celebrating the 500th Anniversary of the Protestant Reformation, so we thought, “Why not combine the two celebrations today in one post?”

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Rev. Klaus Arnold is a German Nazarene and Rector of European Nazarene College on the German/Swiss border.  He is also a friend and he and his wife were commissioned as Global missionaries in our denomination together with Emily and me in February 2007.  Arnold recently wrote an article in Holiness Today entitled “Growing up in Luther’s Shadow” in which he concluded by comparing Luther’s theology with Nazarenes’:

In Germany all Christians, including Nazarenes, have grown up in the large shadow of Martin Luther. Of course, there are key differences. Like Luther, we Nazarenes believe that baptism is a sacrament: a time when God’s grace is present in a special way. However, Luther was known to assert that baptism was the means by which God cleanses us from original sin, and this is not a teaching consistent with doctrinal statements of the Church of the Nazarene.

Another difference is in the doctrines of justification and sanctification. We believe (like Luther) that we are justified by grace alone through faith alone because of what God has done through the person and work of Jesus Christ. However, for Luther the change of relationship between a believer and God is only relative, but there is no real change in the believer.

He believed that a Christian is always “sinner and justified” as long as he/she lives. The Church of the Nazarene believes that while there is a relative change in justification, there is also a real change taking place: we become a new creation.

Sin does not need to reign over us, and we do not have to sin deliberately or consistently. With the infilling of God’s love through the Holy Spirit, our sinful nature is cleansed in entire sanctification.

God’s mission is the renewal of his creation. And part of that is transformation of believers into the image of God (Christlikeness). As we are filled with God’s love, we want to share that with the rest of creation and truly make a difference in our world and participate in God’s mission wherever we are! We affirm, with Luther, that our new life begins and continues by grace through faith in Jesus Christ.

 

The Protestant Reformation 500 Years Later

“Whether by day or by night, whenever the cloud lifted, they set out…At the Lord’s command they encamped, and at the Lord’s command they set out.  They obeyed the Lord’s order, in accordance with his command through Moses” (Numbers 9:21, 23).

October 2017 is a special month. It marks the five-hundredth anniversary of the Protestant Reformation. The end of this month, October 31, will be five hundred years to the day since Martin Luther nailed the Ninety-Five Theses to the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg, Germany. This was the act that started it all, that started the grand and vast movement of Protestantism, that started the Reformation.

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In the evangelical church – and in the Church of the Nazarene specifically – we have obviously been greatly impacted by the Reformation.  If you have ever asked, “Why do we do this or that in the Church?”, many times the answer comes in large part due to the Protestant Reformation.

During the entirety of this month, we will be focusing on this anniversary. At times we will dive into the lives of the Reformers.  Other times we will focus on the core tenets of the Reformation (keep an eye out for the “5 Solas”). The primary purpose will be to help us learn about and reflect upon this enormously important event and how it has brought us to this moment in history as a Christian Church.

At the same time, a secondary purpose is also at work.  By dedicating a month to this topic, I hope that we will recognize that we are a Church that is always willing to evaluate itself and make adjustments as needed.  We have not always been good at that through history, have we? The Church has often been the last entity in society that is willing to change.

Thus, through this month I pray that we would renew our calling to reform, beginning with ourselves.  Just as the post-Exodus Israelites needed to be ready in any moment to follow the cloud, may we be so attuned to God’s presence that we willingly move and adapt at his prompting.  Lord, begin a reformation in me, and in us!

2017 Thank Offering for the World Evangelism Fund

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We must fix our sights on places where the church is not yet, engaging in intercessory prayer, sacrificial giving, and physically going to and mobilizing others to go to these places. Each time you give to the World Evangelism Fund, you send the message of the gospel into areas where “the church is not yet.”

For more information and to download the resources visit the official website: nazarene.org/generosity

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The Challenge is Urban

By Scott Armstrong

Last week I had the privilege of being in Panama where several leaders were gathered to brainstorm solutions for more effective ministry in three areas:

  • Urban Mission
  • Youth
  • Children

These areas have been declared our regional emphases in Mesoamerica for the upcoming Quadrennial.  And rightly so: although great things are currently taking place in each of these ministries, we have a long way to go before we see an explosion of fruit all across the region among children, youth, and our cities.

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I’m sure you have listened to our Worthless Servants podcast recently (if you haven’t, seriously, what are you doing with your life?), and you know we have addressed all three of these issues in various episodes.  However, for the sake of this article, let’s focus on urban mission.

If you have heard my wife and I speak recently in any service or event, you know that we are banging the drum for urban mission.  Our ministry is GENESIS after all, where the mission is to make Christlike disciples in the urban centers of Mesoamerica.  We are sending missionaries to 28 strategic cities so that they may plant churches and impact communities with little or no Nazarene presence.  And it is happening!

Still, I admit that the influence a team of four workers can have in a city of 1 million+ is limited.  And what about the other cities that have not been identified as the 28 strategic, urgent sites that will receive missionaries? It is clear that our whole region needs a genesis and it will not come solely because of a dedicated volunteer missionary force.

This very week while we were in Panama, we received from Dale Jones in Nazarene Research (love them!) a list of all of the cities in the Mesoamerica Region with 100,000 or more in population.  The findings are intriguing and yet staggering:

  1. General statistics show that 72% of Mesoamerica lives in an urban area (this includes several cities of less than 100,000 that are still considered urban). Nearly 3 out of every four of us is an urbanite! When you think of urban, you may think of New York, Beijing, or Tokyo. But we are the region with the highest percentage of urban dwellers.
  2. In just two years we have grown from 169 cities with 100,000 people or more to 182 fitting that description. All over the world people are moving to the big city in droves, and our region is no exception.
  3. Of these 182 metropolises, 115 are in one country: Mexico. One. Five.  Reaching the cities of our region means especially reaching the cities of Mexico, many of which have no Nazarene church.
  4. After Mexico, the four countries that have the most cities with population of 100,000 or more are: Cuba (16), Dominican Republic (9), Haiti (8), and Nicaragua (7). In other words, 155 of the 182 biggest cities in our region are in FIVE countries. Would you pray specifically for urban impact in those five countries?
  5. The total population in Mesoamerica is 223 million. 42 million of us live in cities with greater than 100,000 people.  That’s 54%More of us live in a huge city than don’t.  Shouldn’t this effect the way we equip our leaders for ministry?

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  6. If the majority of our population lives in a big city, then that’s where all our Nazarenes are, too, right? Wrong. Only 32% of our members live in a city of over 100,000 people.  That’s 129,354 out of 406,000 total Nazarenes.

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  7. #5 and #6 above cause me to reflect: I know that we have many Nazarene members in these cities already and I praise the Lord for their witness. However, there is no doubt that in the great majority of these urban settings, we lack a true presence as a Church of the Nazarene.  Having a church building and holding services every week will not cut it.  In order to impact the city, sacrificial, creative, and missional discipleship will be required in the days ahead.
  8. A significant number of these 182 cities have recently been affected adversely by devastating natural disasters. Could it be that our entryway into these cities would come through comforting those who have lost all in hurricanes or earthquakes? Could it be that – even without natural disasters – acting as agents of compassion would be the healthy way to impact our cities anyway?

My intention is not to overwhelm you with statistics.  I recognize that each observation above must be digested thoughtfully for greatest understanding, and I pray you would do so!  Honestly, I share all of this not just to inform, but also to invite you to be a part of this initiative.

Would you pray?

Would you give?

Would you go and impact an urban context right where you are or even far away?

Comment below if God is turning your focus toward the city.  Communicate with us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, or at MesoamericaGenesis.org.  Listen to our podcast and tell others about it so the conversation about these topics spreads.

We need your help.  The statistics are clear and the call of God is clearer: let’s bring a genesis to the urban centers of Mesoamerica.