Many Ways to Worship One God

By Saraí Ramos

A few weeks ago, God gave me the opportunity to travel to Hyderabad, India where I participated in Third Wave, a global gathering of emerging leaders within the Church of the Nazarene.  The main purpose of the event is to provide a space for youth to connect in a cross-cultural setting through fellowship, training, and group dynamics, in order to develop leaders who will make a global impact.

260 people from 61 countries came together January 8-13, 2019, and you can just imagine all the differences in language, forms of dress, food, and other craziness that we lived through there!

b3fa6ff9-a89e-4ae3-8ff6-47679935cce9.JPG

In fact, one of the most memorable times of the event happened the first day when I was able to meet Olly and Clayton, two young men from Australia that love their Samoan culture and enjoy sharing it with anyone who will listen.  Throughout the week we were delighted to get to know them and admire their Hakas, typical Samoan dances, language, clothing, and many other things.

7e8c8599-f1d5-454b-ae6b-f1a254394b8c.JPG

Saraí with Olly and Clayton

But the thing that impacted me most was the passion on their faces when they danced during the talent show.  Clayton, Olly, and the Asia-Pacific Region made us all feel like we were part of a Samoan movie.  It was as if we were all in Disney’s Moana!  Can you imagine the excitement in the room when we were all experiencing that dance?!

84181241-c50c-4ec1-bc8b-5397c8b5e32d.JPGWhen they finished their presentation, they told us that the music was a typical Christian song. That was one of the ways they worshipped God in their home countries.

You know what? All of the time spent with them reminded me that there are innumerable ways to praise the Lord and share his love with others.  I believe every one of us should be like Olly and Clayton: proud of our Christian culture and passionately sharing the love and joy we have found in Jesus at every opportunity.

*Saraí Ramos is president of Nazarene Youth International in the Gulf District of Mexico.

Advertisements

Harmon Schmelzenbach III remembered

HarmonANUField.png

A week ago I shared about the impact that the nazarene missionary Harmon Schmelzenbach III made in my life and particularly in my call to missions. Today we want to share an article published by NCN News that honors the memory of this great man of God. 

At 12 years old, Harmon Schmelzenbach III spoke to Swazi evangelist Joseph Mkwanazi at a camp meeting in Endingeni, Swaziland. Harmon later shared that this conversation confirmed his call to be a pastor and missionary like his father and grandfather. He would spend the next 13 years preparing for this work.

Harmon Schmelzenbach III was born in Nampa, Idaho, in 1935. His parents, Elmer and Mary, were about to become missionaries in Swaziland, where Elmer was raised. They took Harmon to Africa when he was only a few weeks old.

He spent his early childhood in Swaziland. When he was 11, he and his sister Marilyn began attending boarding school in the Republic of South Africa. Boarding school was a common experience for many missionary kids. In their case, the school was close enough to their parents that they could come home some weekends.

In 1952, Harmon returned to Nampa and enrolled in Northwest Nazarene College. He met Beverly, two years younger, and they married while they were students. After graduation, he served as a pastor in the area until Beverly completed her degree.

They received their assignment as missionaries to the RSA in 1960 and worked at first among the Pedi people of the Northern Transvaal. Harmon later commented that the Pedis spoke “a difficult, guttural language that I had been unable to pick up as a child.”

The next year, they moved to Blouberg, the northernmost Nazarene station in the RSA. The area’s rugged terrain required a jeep for travel. Southern Africa remained their field of labor for a quarter-century.

They stood, to some degree, on the shoulders of two generations of missionary predecessors. His grandfather, the first Harmon Schmelzenbach, opened the original Nazarene missions in Swaziland, South Africa, and Mozambique in the early 20th century. After a half-century in Africa, though, Nazarenes had barely reached beyond their base in the south.

By the late 1970s, there was a growing sense that expansion into West and East Africa was overdue. Implementing these initiatives would call for entrepreneurial leadership, and Harmon had been demonstrating precisely this.

In 1971, he took personal initiative to register the Church of the Nazarene in Botswana. In 1977, he and Beverly moved to Namibia to build a new district there. They remained there until 1984.

At that time, the World Mission Department chose Harmon to guide Nazarene expansion in a new area. He became the East Africa Field’s first director. They moved to Kenya, purchased property in Nairobi, and began directing strategies that led to opening new missions and churches in Tanzania, Uganda, Rwanda, and Zaire.

In Kenya, Harmon established a school to train preachers but dreamed of something grander — a Christian university for East Africa. His early planning laid the groundwork for others to build Africa Nazarene University, which the General Assembly and the Kenyan government authorized in 1993, which then opened in 1994.

“Dr. Harmon Schmelzenbach personally chose the land on which the university sits, claimed it for God and the Church of the Nazarene by faith in prayer and later arranged for the purchase of the land. Today, the building that houses the university’s administration is named after him — the Harmon Schmelzenbach Building,” said Stanley M. Bhebhe, vice chancellor of Africa Nazarene University.

By then, the Schmelzenbachs had been in Addis Ababa for two years, pioneering Nazarene work in Ethiopia and Eritrea. A Marxist regime had closed Ethiopia to new Protestant work for nearly two decades, but the regime had changed. Ethiopia would prove to be a productive field.

In 1994, Harmon was appointed “Missionary at Large” and began traveling widely, speaking at conventions and assemblies, raising mission awareness among Nazarenes generally by retelling family stories from Africa.

Harmon and Beverly retired in 2001, establishing their home in Clearwater, Florida, but they contributed to missions even in retirement. The Eurasia regional director at the time, Franklin Cook, asked them to train new Nazarene leaders in Hungary, and they lived, without complaint, in a cramped room in Budapest for a season.

Harmon Schmelzenbach III died on 2 January 2019 at age 83. He is survived by his wife, their three children, and their grandchildren.

This article was originally published at: NCN News

Harmon Schmelzenbach III: A Missionary Legacy

A few days ago much of the Church of the Nazarene worldwide was informed of the death of Harmon Schmelzenbach III on January 2, 2019.h schmelzenbach  NCN News published a worthy obituary of Harmon, which should certainly be read by any Nazarene who wants to become familiar with missions in our denomination.

I was never able to formally meet Harmon III, although I have ministered alongside his son, Harmon IV, and his grandson, Quinton, in different settings during the past several years.  However, without knowing me, Harmon III made an impact on my life.

I grew up as a part of Central Church of the Nazarene in Lenexa, Kansas, USA.  We often had 8-10 missionaries a year preach in our services (side note: I cannot fathom when churches who receive one or two missionaries a year complain of “having too many missionaries”).  All were important in building the foundation for what later I would recognize as God’s missions call on my life, although I would not say many were memorable, per se.

schmelz iv & q

Quinton and Harmon Schmelzenbach IV have carried on their family’s missions legacy.

Harmon Schmelzenbach III was the exception!  As an adolescent, I remember his tales of traversing the African landscape in order to preach the gospel to new villages and people-groups.  I remember some of the perils of the wildlife he encountered on those trips.  By the time he told us he had crossed the fourth river, I looked down at my watch and realized he had literally been preaching for an hour and 45 minutes! That may seem shocking, but what stuns me even more is that at that age I had not even noticed!  He had our entire youth group (and the rest of the congregation) entranced by his evangelistic passion and ability to tell the story of missions and of God himself.

Needless to say, when God called me five or six years later to be a missionary, I was ready.  It was not an “out-of-the-blue” thing.  If God was calling me to be like Harmon, my answer would be an immediate “yes.”  And now, having ministered cross-culturally for 16 years, I see how I have been influenced by this “giant of the faith” both on the field and as I share with churches on home assignment.

Missions has changed in the past three decades since then and now more of us live as missionaries in big strategic urban centers.  Many of us will never need to cross many rivers and fend off venomous snakes at every turn.  But the passion for spreading the good news of Jesus Christ must never wane.  Harmon III learned that from his parents and grandparents and passed it on to future generations of Schmelzenbachs.  But he also passed it on to me as well.

Third Wave: Running the Race

the glory of heaven by giovanni da san giovanni in the basilica di santi quattro coronati in rome

“The Glory of Heaven” by Giovanni da San Giovanni in the Basilica di Santi Quattro Coronati in Rome

Hundreds of teens and youth leaders from around the world are traveling today to the Third Wave youth conference that will be held in Hyderabad, India.  This initiative is one of the most significant events that the Church of the Nazarene holds every 3-4 years in order to raise up and equip emerging youth leaders.  Although I will not be participating this year, I had the privilege to travel to Bangkok, Thailand and San José, Costa Rica in 2012 and 2015, respectively, and those Third Wave conferences made an impact on all of us who were there.2019 3rd wave

One of the most influential moments in Thailand occurred on January 8, 2012 when General Superintendent Dr. Eugenio Duarte gave the closing message entitled, “Making Christlike Disciples in the Nations.” With youth from 56 different countries represented and the Lord’s Supper being served, this sermon was far from mere theory.  This was a challenge to those present and to all youth of every nation to engage in our core mission.

For young people who want to see the world changed in a blink of an eye, Dr. Duarte reminded us from Hebrews 12 that we are running a race, and that this race is a marathon, not a sprint.  Although there are many reasons why people race (to be healthy, to participate with others, or to compete and win, for example), we as Christians race to change the world.

Hebrews 12 is clear, as well, that this is a race that requires encouragement, clarity, perseverance, skills, discipline and motivation.  Many of these are in short supply in the world around us.  In fact, we may feel at times so weary that our goal seems unattainable.  But Duarte stressed powerfully that winning will come.  We will win the world!  We do recognize that there will be deep valleys during this race.  Yet, we do not overlook the blessings that come in disguise in the valleys.

As we race in this marathon, the question arises as our bodies and spirits tire: how are we able to run with perseverance? Hebrews 12 gives us the recipe.cloud of witnesses 1

  1. Remember the great cloud of witnesses (v.1).  Hebrews 11 is the encouragement we need: it is a chapter full of real people with real difficulties serving really faithfully.  But who are the people that have also gone before us in our lives: those mentors and leaders who have invested in us? We must not forget them! They gave their best. We must give our best! They gave all.  Jesus gave all (vv.1-2) and we must give all!
  2. Get rid of sin and travel light.  Many of us think of our need for forgiveness as a one-time thing.  But an app on a smart phone must constantly be updated.  There are bug fixes and new software tools. We also be constantly sensitive to God’s provoking and prompting.  We must never grow complacent.  We must not admire holiness, but rather PURSUE holiness.  Sin is not defined by culture.  Sin is defined by God and his convictions.  Susanna Wesley wrote to her son, John, in 1725 with this definition: “Whatever weakens your reason, impairs the tenderness of your conscience, obscures your sense of God, or takes off your relish of spiritual things; in short, whatever increases the strength and authority of your body over your mind, that thing is sin to you, however innocent it may be in itself.”  We must update our app constantly!  We must throw off all that entangles and hinders!
  3. Be disciplined and possess a singular focus. Faith is the subject of chapter 11.  But faith goes hand in hand with discipline.  The best marathoners say they cannot ever miss a day of training.  Why then are we so nonchalant with our spiritual discipline(s) and training? We must fix our eyes steadfastly on Jesus!  What are the goals that He has set for you? Consider him, know him, love him, and be a true follower of Jesus Christ!  Even as we think about and admire our mentors and the great people of faith who have gone before, we do not fix our eyes on them, but rather on JESUS, the author and perfecter of our faith.

We responded to the message from Dr. Duarte by praying at the altar and sharing a meaningful time of Holy Communion.  But I believe we all responded afterwards, too, by running the race.  Let’s pray this Third Wave in India helps create marathon-running, disciplined and persevering world changers once again.

David’s Promise

The annual observance of the International Day of Disabled Persons (3 December) was proclaimed in 1992, by an United Nations General Assembly resolution. The observance of the Day aims to promote an understanding of disability issues and mobilize support for the dignity, rights and well-being of persons with disabilities. It also seeks to increase awareness of gains to be derived from the integration of persons with disabilities in every aspect of political, social, economic and cultural life.

On this day it’s a joy to know that in our Nazarene Church we have a place for everyone!

Captura de pantalla 2018-10-31 a la(s) 12.31.19.png

At JaxNaz Church in Jackson, Michigan, USA, adults with special needs have found a new way to serve through a unique day program. From tying blankets for children in foster care to creating recipes for a community cookbook, the members of David’s Promise are making a difference and gaining fulfillment.

Watch the video below to know more about this awesome ministry:

 

Returning Home

Nazareno and Yamila grew up attending church in Buenos Aires, Argentina, but left the church in early adulthood. After a serious car accident, Nazareno struggled with feelings of depression. It wasn’t until a neighbor introduced them to the Church of the Nazarene that their hearts for the Lord were renewed.

Captura de pantalla 2018-10-31 a la(s) 14.28.08.png

Watch the video below and see how God transformed this family: 

Help for Migrants in Mexico

45561968_2156109701100723_3953999836759457792_o.jpg

In October more than 7,000 children, women, men and older adults from Honduras started a journey that has taken several weeks.  Recently people from other countries have also joined them as they have traversed from the south border of Mexico to the north in order to eventually arrive in the United States. They have left their countries because of the reality of violence and poverty that confronted them there. 

The Church of the Nazarene has responded to a variety of the caravan’s different needs through Nazarene Compassionate Ministries, and have fulfilled the call of God to freely give what we have freely received. 

Click on the video below to see how the Church has mobilized to help in the past  month: